SHS General Meeting: Smuggling in Devon

 

Over fifty people attended Salcombe History Society's last general meeting, held on 21st June 2017 at Salcombe Rugby Club. Members were treated to an interesting talk by author Robert Hesketh on smuggling in the Devon, during which he revealed that most inhabitants of coastal communities were involved in some way and here in the South Hams, the tower of Thurlestone Church was used to store smuggled spirits.

The new Salcombe History Society advertising banner was also revealed, modelled here by Chairman Ken Prowse.

Next Meeting 21st June

 

Robert Hesketh Talk on Smuggling in Devon

When: 7pm for 7.30pm on Wednesday 21st June 2017

Where: Salcombe Rugby Club, Camperdown Road, Salcombe, TQ8 8AX

All welcome. Admission: £3 non-members, £1 members

Refreshments will be available

Contact: Ken Prowse

Email: info@salcombehistorysociety.co.uk

Telephone: 01548 854075

Upcoming Events

Find us at:

 

What: South Hams Vintage Machinery Club Rally

When: Saturday 12th & Sunday 13th August 2017

Where: Sorley Cross, Kingsbridge, TQ7 4AF

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What: Kingsbridge Show

When: Saturday 2nd September 2017

Where: The Showground, Borough Farm, Kingsbridge, TQ9 7QP

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A Little Piece of Salcombe’s History

Salcombe History Society has been entrusted to care for a little piece of Salcombe's history in the shape of a small lead ball. It was handed to Chairman Ken Prowse at the Society's AGM by its finder, Bob Dunne. Found at Salcombe Castle (Fort Charles), the lead musket ball, approximately 1cm in diameter, probably dates from the Civil War. Sir Edmund Fortescue received orders from King Charles I to hold the fort against the Parliamentarians when Plymouth rose against the king and it became the last place to hold out for the royal cause. The castle was besieged from 15 January until 7 May 1646 when it became clear that all the other royalist strongholds had fallen. After the Civil War, Parliament ordered the castle to be ruined as it was too dangerous to allow it to remain.